Module 1 in Lumi

The Before

I created my online course to help students attain a recovery credit in Math 10WA. Module 1 focuses on Trigonometry which can be a difficult unit for grade 10 students. To view my course prototype, click here.

 

The Now

Over the past 10 days, I have spent countless hours creating a “shell” for my first module. To say the least, I underestimated the amount of time it would take setting up an asynchronous course online. I found myself asking the same question “how will this actually work?” My head was spinning thinking of all the things I still needed to create (syllabus, rubrics, instructional videos, assessments, etc.), and I quickly became overwhelmed. I tried visualizing how my students would access all their materials without getting confused or missing important information. With a few extra cups of coffee this past week, I figured out a solution I “think” will work.

 

I ended up creating a “daily agenda” for my students to follow. Everything is in one document; including links to all their instructional videos, assignments, assessments, course syllabus, intro videos, extra assignments, practice tests, and more. I made the document into a checklist so they can mark off their completed tasks and stay on schedule. The students just have to click the links! Should be easy peasy (I hope). To view my course agenda, click here. **NOTE: This took a very very very long time! 

To keep things consistent, I chose to create all my instructional videos in a similar format. I ended up recording all my lessons through Annotate, then edited each one in iMovie, and finally uploaded the files to YouTube. After this very long process, I copy and pasted my YouTube links into Lumi and added interactions to each one. This was the first time I used Lumi and I really enjoyed the template. The first video took me a while to figure out, but by the time I finished my 8th video, it only took me a few minutes. I integrated True/False statements to check for understanding multiple times throughout my lessons. I used Multiple choice questions for students to check their answers (before) viewing the solutions on the video. *This way they are not watching the video and becoming bored/distracted with other things around them. It forces them to pay attention to the material and practice the example questions “with” me. I added additional links into my lessons to help students navigate their calculator skills (for example: helping students reset their calculator to degrees). I also used the Crossroads feature which allows students to skip to the next question if they are feeling confident with the content. At the end of each instructional video, I added a link to their daily assignments and a link to their ‘check for understanding quiz’ via google forms. Everything they need can be accessed through the instructional video. It’s amazing what technology allows us to do! Overall, I was very pleased with Lumi and I will most likely continue using this platform for future modules.

The first video I created in Lumi was a Calculator Escape Room activity. This is a short activity I like to do on the first day of classes with my students so they feel comfortable navigating different buttons on their calculators before starting course content. Please give it a try (if you want). You will need a calculator, pen and paper! NOTE: It doesn’t work well on your phone screen so I suggest using a computer/laptop. Here is the LINK.

 

The other 7 videos I created in Lumi are my instructional videos for each lesson I teach. These are not as fancy or fun as my first video, but if you want to check them out, here are the links:

Lesson 1 – Pythagorean Theorem

Lesson 2 – Pythagorean Theorem Word Problems

Lesson 3 – Intro to Trigonometry

Lesson 4 – Using Trig to Find Unknown Side Lengths

Lesson 5 – Using Trig to Find Unknown Angles

Lesson 6 – Solving Right Triangles

Lesson 7 – Trigonometry Word Problems

 

My thoughts about assessments…

 

I am trying to think realistically about this course. My time is limited and I need my students to stay engaged and motivated. I have no idea if this will work or not, but some big decisions I made were:

 

  1. Keeping all my formative assessments online. At the end of each lesson, students will complete questions via Google Forms (Quizzes) and receive immediate feedback. All their answers will automatically be sent to me afterwards. Since I am teaching full-time, this seems like the easiest and most convenient way to see how my students are doing.
  2. Keeping all my summative assessments in-person. I want my students to be present during summative assessments and have an adult supervise to support them if they need clarifications on questions and to ensure they are completing their own work. Students will also be encouraged to draw pictures and show their work (step-by-step) to receive full marks (similar to my in-person classes). 
  3. Incorporating an online communication piece to my course breakdown. Having my students check-in daily through Discord will (hopefully) motivate students to complete work in a timely manner and hold them accountable to communicate with others throughout the course. I have created two simple online assignments for the students to complete during the course as well. These took very little time to plan and organize.

 

The Future

In the near future, I plan on creating 6 more modules so I can have all my Math 10WA units online for students to access. I find that high school students do better when they have a set routine and know what to expect. I plan on creating similar videos and following the same template for my other units. I am optimistic that next module will be easier to create and upload, because I have found what works best for me.

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Module 1 in Lumi

The Before

I created my online course to help students attain a recovery credit in Math 10WA. Module 1 focuses on Trigonometry which can be a difficult unit for grade 10 students. To view my course prototype, click here.

 

The Now

Over the past 10 days, I have spent countless hours creating a “shell” for my first module. To say the least, I underestimated the amount of time it would take setting up an asynchronous course online. I found myself asking the same question “how will this actually work?” My head was spinning thinking of all the things I still needed to create (syllabus, rubrics, instructional videos, assessments, etc.), and I quickly became overwhelmed. I tried visualizing how my students would access all their materials without getting confused or missing important information. With a few extra cups of coffee this past week, I figured out a solution I “think” will work.

 

I ended up creating a “daily agenda” for my students to follow. Everything is in one document; including links to all their instructional videos, assignments, assessments, course syllabus, intro videos, extra assignments, practice tests, and more. I made the document into a checklist so they can mark off their completed tasks and stay on schedule. The students just have to click the links! Should be easy peasy (I hope). To view my course agenda, click here. **NOTE: This took a very very very long time! 

To keep things consistent, I chose to create all my instructional videos in a similar format. I ended up recording all my lessons through Annotate, then edited each one in iMovie, and finally uploaded the files to YouTube. After this very long process, I copy and pasted my YouTube links into Lumi and added interactions to each one. This was the first time I used Lumi and I really enjoyed the template. The first video took me a while to figure out, but by the time I finished my 8th video, it only took me a few minutes. I integrated True/False statements to check for understanding multiple times throughout my lessons. I used Multiple choice questions for students to check their answers (before) viewing the solutions on the video. *This way they are not watching the video and becoming bored/distracted with other things around them. It forces them to pay attention to the material and practice the example questions “with” me. I added additional links into my lessons to help students navigate their calculator skills (for example: helping students reset their calculator to degrees). I also used the Crossroads feature which allows students to skip to the next question if they are feeling confident with the content. At the end of each instructional video, I added a link to their daily assignments and a link to their ‘check for understanding quiz’ via google forms. Everything they need can be accessed through the instructional video. It’s amazing what technology allows us to do! Overall, I was very pleased with Lumi and I will most likely continue using this platform for future modules.

The first video I created in Lumi was a Calculator Escape Room activity. This is a short activity I like to do on the first day of classes with my students so they feel comfortable navigating different buttons on their calculators before starting course content. Please give it a try (if you want). You will need a calculator, pen and paper! NOTE: It doesn’t work well on your phone screen so I suggest using a computer/laptop. Here is the LINK.

 

The other 7 videos I created in Lumi are my instructional videos for each lesson I teach. These are not as fancy or fun as my first video, but if you want to check them out, here are the links:

Lesson 1 – Pythagorean Theorem

Lesson 2 – Pythagorean Theorem Word Problems

Lesson 3 – Intro to Trigonometry

Lesson 4 – Using Trig to Find Unknown Side Lengths

Lesson 5 – Using Trig to Find Unknown Angles

Lesson 6 – Solving Right Triangles

Lesson 7 – Trigonometry Word Problems

 

My thoughts about assessments…

 

I am trying to think realistically about this course. My time is limited and I need my students to stay engaged and motivated. I have no idea if this will work or not, but some big decisions I made were:

 

  1. Keeping all my formative assessments online. At the end of each lesson, students will complete questions via Google Forms (Quizzes) and receive immediate feedback. All their answers will automatically be sent to me afterwards. Since I am teaching full-time, this seems like the easiest and most convenient way to see how my students are doing.
  2. Keeping all my summative assessments in-person. I want my students to be present during summative assessments and have an adult supervise to support them if they need clarifications on questions and to ensure they are completing their own work. Students will also be encouraged to draw pictures and show their work (step-by-step) to receive full marks (similar to my in-person classes). 
  3. Incorporating an online communication piece to my course breakdown. Having my students check-in daily through Discord will (hopefully) motivate students to complete work in a timely manner and hold them accountable to communicate with others throughout the course. I have created two simple online assignments for the students to complete during the course as well. These took very little time to plan and organize.

 

The Future

In the near future, I plan on creating 6 more modules so I can have all my Math 10WA units online for students to access. I find that high school students do better when they have a set routine and know what to expect. I plan on creating similar videos and following the same template for my other units. I am optimistic that next module will be easier to create and upload, because I have found what works best for me.

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Creating a Community in an Online Course

For my prototype, I created a recovery course for students who have previously failed Math 10 Workplace and Apprenticeship. My course design is completely online (except for exams), and students work at their own pace through the modules (asynchronously). You might wonder why I choose to go asynchronously, especially for a math class. Well it wasn’t my first choice…

Originally, I tried to think of how I could “blend” my course because I know it is important to be “present” with my students, whether it is through Zoom or in-person.  However, I had to be realistic regarding my current job and coaching expectations at the school I work at. In my school division, we only get one prep a year and mine is usually in the first semester because I coach fall sports. I am predicting my course will run in the second semester after the first round of Math 10WA students have taken their face-to-face class with an instructor. For those students who fail this course, they will need an opportunity to recover their credit in the second semester (this is where my online course comes in). Since I will be teaching full-time in the second semester, I am only available to meet with students before school, during lunch, and after school (until Track & Field starts up in the spring). Because of my schedule, I chose to create an asynchronous online course.

After watching the videos and reading the articles/blogs from this weeks tasks, I am inspired to find ways to encourage students to engage with one another and build a sense of community in an online learning environment. As Michael Wesch suggests in the second video, you should try to “humanize your online class” and “build relationships” with your students. He does this by videoing  positive shout-outs to students in his courses, getting on camera so his students see that he is human while creating memorable (and unique) learning experiences for them to view (cycling and giving a lecture). Kudos to him… I’m not sure if I can do that while teaching math, but I’m willing to try and be more creative! His suggestions challenged me to think of ways I can be more “present” for my students asynchronously.

To build community in an online course, I need to figure out a way my students can communicate.

1 – DISCORD

Similar to our course (EC&I), I will have students join Discord. This app is free, easily accessible to any device, and is user-friendly.  Students can take pictures of their work and send directly to the instructor (me), or share in a group chat with other students in the class to verify their work has been done correctly. Depending on how many students I have in my course (which is unknown at the time), I can set up discussion channels and prompt my students to engage with one another. If I only have 1 student in my course, this app still provides them an opportunity to ask me questions when they need some additional instruction.

2 – MEETING IN-PERSON IN THE LIBRARY 1x/week

The videos and articles from this week highly suggest meeting in real-time with your students. This will be tricky for me if I am teaching 5 classes during the day. Instead of finding a time to meet during the school hours, I will encourage students to meet me in the library Wednesdays at lunch for 15-20 minutes during math tutorial. This way, they will have an opportunity to meet me in-person and ask me questions for clarity/guidance, or just to visit! And everyone needs to eat, so I can bring my lunch upstairs with me and be available to my online learners. Note: this will be completely optional for the students.

3 – FLIPGRID

To establish social pressure, I will use FlipGrid to connect with my students (on video). This forces me to get on camera more often and humanize my online learning environment. I’m sure the students will appreciate videos of me explaining certain assignments or providing additional instructions for a specific question I want them to work on.

I love FlipGrid and used it a lot when I taught grade 8. The students don’t always enjoy videoing themselves (they mentioned this to me a lot when we used this app), but they can always adjust their camera angle and video themselves working through a question on paper instead. It will still create a personal touch to hear their voices and/or watch them problem-solve. FlipGrid is an appropriate tool to use for my online class because I can pre-record video(s) on my own schedule and have students share their replies asynchronously as well.

What guidelines or assessment practices will I adopt to ensure that interactions are meaningful, supportive, engaging, and relevant?

This is a great question… I am not sure how many people will be registered for my online class until it starts up. I could have 6 students, or I could be stuck with 1 student who failed the course semester 1. If I only have one student, well then… they are stuck to watching videos of me and texting/sending pictures to me on the Discord app. I am not the most interesting person in the world, but I will do my best to give that one student as much support as I can! If I only had one student in my course, I could still create an online assignment component (for marks) in my course breakdown. This would be for x% (haven’t decided yet) of their overall marks in my course.

The online assignment component would include: sending assignments through FlipGrid, Google Classroom (our main LMS) and/or Discord throughout the course. Students would be prompted each week (similar to our class right now) with a simple task. It could be as simple as sending a picture of their work on Discord to view or sharing a video through FlipGrid of different questions from the workbook. This would keep my student(s) motivated to stay up-to-date with coursework and prepared to share their learning with me (instructor) or with others (if I have 2+ students). By sending out different prompts, it would give my learners an opportunity to touch base each week and see how things are going.

All my ideas sound good in writing, but how will they actually work in real-time? I’m not exactly sure.

The problem I foresee with my class design is that students may be working on modules at different paces. Note: I hope to have all 7 modules for my Math 10WA course up and running by next year. I’m not sure how to change my class structure without adding pressure for students to complete modules at the same pace.

Any ideas or suggestions are welcome!

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Online Course for Math 10WA

Over the past 2 weeks I have been chasing my tail trying to decide what course I will design for this assignment. I currently have three ADDIE templates open on my google documents and I am determined to design online courses for my Wellness 10 and Math 9 classes (in the near future). Remind you – I am on maternity leave and have some extra time! Due to deadlines in this class (EC&I 834), I need more time to design these courses and figure out HOW learning will occur and WHAT assessments will be used to support student learning in the most appropriate way. 

 

Right now I had to think about what is needed in my school, and how this course will support students in mathematics.

 

I chose to create an online course for students to recover a grade 10 credit in the workplace and apprenticeship math stream. Every year when I teach this class, I have students fail the course because they are unable to keep up with classroom content, or have been removed from class as a result of violating the school’s attendance policy, or students have quit coming to class due to personal reasons. I believe students who have failed this course should be given another opportunity to try again; whether that is enrolling in another face-to-face Math 10WA class with a teacher, or completing the required modules online (on their own).

 

To view my full course profile and planning template, click here.

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My Experiences with Blended Learning

As someone who has always preferred reading articles from paper copies and writing notes with pen and paper, I have learned to appreciate using technology in the education field. Don’t get me wrong, looking at a screen for a long period of time is not my favorite. In fact, I find myself experiencing headaches if I am staring at my computer and/or phone for too long. I understand that online learning has many benefits, however, I still enjoy face-to-face traditional classroom teaching without the use of technology. I believe a good balance of online learning and traditional classroom teaching resembles my current teaching-style.

After reading Chapter 10 in our required readings and discussing this topic online, I have learned there are many variations of blended learning that I am currently using in my classroom. Since COVID changed the world of teaching, I continue to use online platforms to share lessons and other educational resources with my students and their families. This has allowed me to stay connected with my students at home if they are away for a period of time, and help keep them on track with daily activities. Educational technology has allowed me to keep my lessons and assignments organized, and provides tools to aid student learning. Technology gives me the opportunity to work from home or other places at my own convenience, share information effortlessly, and provides fun and engaging activities to my lessons. Online platforms such as Google Drive and Google Classroom have been my “go-to” choices allowing me to create, edit, and post classroom resources with ease. 

My experience using blended learning as a high school math teacher, involves preparing all my lesson plans using google slides. When I teach, I upload my presentation on my TV and use my iPad and apple pencil to work through practice problems one-by-one with my students. I can also add additional links with instructional videos and/or webpages to my lesson plans. Lately, I have been pre-recording my lessons and uploading these videos via YouTube so I can share the link quickly with my students. This has helped my students review important concepts taught in class and provides an opportunity to re-watch the lessons from home. I have also been using various online platforms for quick formative check-ins and summative assessments. A few of these platforms I use include: FlipGrid, Quizizz, google forms, and ZipGrade. These platforms have SAVED ME SO MUCH TIME with marking and photocopying, and have been very user-friendly. Teaching math can get very repetitive so I have been incorporating math games into my unit plans. Some online math games that my students enjoy are jeopardy, escape rooms, and kahoots. I am able to reuse these platforms every semester and can quickly add/edit questions that are suitable for my students and the different classes I teach. 

As a newer teacher in mathematics, I am still in the process of developing unit and lesson plans. This has taken a lot of time and effort on my end to ensure my resources are in the correct files and my content is ready to use. Even though the preparation time has been extensive, I feel that once my files are completed, I can continue editing and updating them each semester to improve the quality of my content, and better meet the needs of my students. Along with online platforms, I feel face-to-face instructional strategies are appropriate to use in mathematics. It is necessary for students to work through practice questions on paper or whiteboards. It allows them to work through problems step-by-step and correct their mistakes in the learning process. This is SO IMPORTANT in math!

Using technology in an education setting also comes with some challenges. In the school I work at, we do not have enough computers/chromebooks for each student to use. Therefore, we are limited to using specific pieces of equipment supplied by the school. Some teachers may choose for students to use their personal cell phones; however, that comes with additional challenges. From my own personal experience, I have witnessed many students getting off-task and browsing the web, or sending snapchat messages to their friends. This makes it difficult for teachers to monitor student behavior during class time. Ensuring that the internet, apps and/or websites will work can be another challenge teachers and students face. I can probably speak for most of us when I say technology can be frustrating when it doesn’t work!

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